What is responsible for the mass failure in Neco, Jamb, Weac, and in Our Higher Institutions.

The National Examinations Council (NECO) has recorded another mass failure in the November/December Senior School Certificate Examinations (SSCE).

The registrar to the examination body, Professor Promise Okpala, made the announcement on Wednesday, while releasing the results at the council headquarters in Minna, Niger state.

Continue reading What is responsible for the mass failure in Neco, Jamb, Weac, and in Our Higher Institutions.

AUC backs Okonjo-Iweala for WB presidency

The African Union Commission (AUC) says it has nominated Nigerian Finance minister Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala to contest the World Bank (WB) presidency.

In a statement AUC said Okonjo-Iweala, possessed undisputed credentials in technical and managerial expertise, as well as a strong track record as a development professional, both inside and outside the WB.
The AUC said it attached great importance to the on-going selection exercise for the next president of the WB and was happy to note the commitment to an open, transparent and merit-based process.

“The crux of development issues in the world today really resides in Africa and therefore, the success of the World Bank in achieving its mandate will be judged, to a large extent, by its accomplishments on the continent,” the commission said.

“The AUC, on behalf of African countries, is pleased to endorse the Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala candidacy in the strongest possible terms.”

Continue reading AUC backs Okonjo-Iweala for WB presidency

How to Write a Professional CV that Wins Interviews

How to Write a Professional CV that Wins Interviews

Jobsite finds out how to write a professional CV that wins you an interview.

You’ve found the ideal job vacancy. Now you need the ‘how to’ guide to write your professional CV. Most people are aware of the standard professional CV build: employment history, qualifications, contact details – but which key ingredients impress employers and win a place on their interview shortlist?

“Before you start to write your professional CV, write down your ten greatest achievements,” says Peter Appleby, Managing Director of Appleby Associates. “This should help you get in the right mindset, which is a marketing mindset. Your achievements demonstrate your proven abilities and what you have to offer. You’re a product being sold to a company, and the goal of your professional CV is to communicate what you can do for them. By considering your achievements first, you won’t fall into the trap of describing your skills without offering evidence to substantiate them.”

Many jobseekers know the basics of how to write a CV, but they don’t build a professional CV that’s a real killer.Linking key skills and abilities with real-life achievements when you write your CV, such as awards or work successes, is a sure-fire way to impress, according to the employers we spoke to. “It’s important that everything you say about yourself on your CV is supported by concrete evidence,” says Harry Freedman, Chief Executive of Career Energy. “So when you describe your key skills and abilities, make sure you back up these claims. Your professional CV is the only thing potential employers will know about you before they meet you in person, so it has to be convincing and sell you strongly.” And how not to write a CV? One of the things employers tell us they hate the most is CV jargon, which loosely means describing yourself as ‘a highly dedicated worker, with excellent attention to detail’ without giving any real life examples of how you’ve already demonstrated these abilities. Always make sure you back up your claims with hard evidence.

Tailor your professional CV to fit your employer. You should never send an ‘identikit’ version to multiple employers by email. Recruiters really object to being spammed by cut and paste CVs. Instead, find out as much as you can about what your recruiters want from your professional CV beforehand. Employers can be very subjective in their preferences, even if they don’t realise it. For example, Noel Marshall of recruitment agency Finance Professionals, categorically states that a personal summary including hobbies and interests gives recruiters a flavour of your personality. Whilst headhunter Andrew Baber of Planning for People believes unequivocally that personal summaries are ‘white noise’ which no-one ever reads.

Almost every employer we spoke to emphasised the need to keep a professional CV as short as possible: no more than two pages long, with plenty of white space and a good font size. A ‘stuffed’ looking CV was rated as very unappealing by employers and a warning sign that the potential employee can’t prioritise. Your goal is to communicate clearly and quickly that you’re right for the job, and this means keeping text to a minimum. “Your professional CV is a document that must be inviting to read,” says Freedman, “which means making it very easy on the eye. There should be lots of white space and you should only write what’s really necessary.” Most employment vacancies are oversubscribed, so you won’t be thanked for adding to a recruiter’s workload by sending pages and pages of CV material for them to wade through.

Essential items are clear, accurate contact details (including your email address) at the top of each page of your professional CV, details of previous employment and your qualifications. According to ‘Why You? CV Messages to Win Jobs’ author, John Lees, who carried out detailed surveys of employers, for each of your previous jobs you should write a brief overview of your position, and then a separate paragraph listing the key skills demonstrated during your employment.

Lees also notes that the majority of recruiters prefer employment histories starting with the most recent first and appearing before a candidate’s qualifications. According to Lees, only a third of employers were interested in GCSE and A Level grades, and professional CVs that begin with school qualifications, or other irrelevant qualifications, were cited as very unappealing.

Good presentation is very important. “You should use plain, white A4 paper and a standard font such as Times New Roman or Arial,” says Appleby. “Absolutely no, shall we say, ‘artistic’ fonts.” Also proof read, double-check and triple-check for errors. Before you dismiss this as an obvious point you would be amazed how many ‘professional’ CVs employers receive with typos and spelling mistakes. According to a nationwide survey of recruitment professionals carried out by the Recruitment & Employment Confederation, 47% said that out of all the professional CVs they received, over half (50%) contained grammatical errors, with the worst offenders in the 21-25 year-old age group. For a recruiter with a mountain of professional CVs to work through, even one little error is a welcome reason to file an application in the pile marked ‘dustbin’.

Stand out from the crowd. If your research indicates your recruiter may favour a creative approach, don’t be afraid to be different. With three hundred black and white two-page CVs to get through, a cleverly creative approach can brighten an employer’s day. Examples which have made it through the door include a standard, professional CV coupled with a doll of the potential employee marketed as a super-hero with their employable qualities written on the box. Whilst one creative applicant seeking work with an events company put together an ‘invitation’ to employ her, complete with party poppers and streamers.

Perhaps most importantly, get a second opinion. “It’s a good idea to get a professional to look over your CV once it’s finished,” says Nick Rous, a career coach for Learn Direct. “Career coaches at Learn Direct can check your CV for free and make sure it’s correctly structured and includes the right amount of detail. A professional CV is not about cutting corners, get advice and take the time to do it properly.”

Face Transplant

Richard Norris is seen before (L) and after (R) his face transplant surgery in this combination of undated handout photos released by the University of Maryland Medical Center. Surgeons from the University of Maryland Medical Center on March 27, 2012, detailed what they said was the world's most comprehensive face transplant, allowing the 37-year-old Virginia man to emerge from behind a mask 15 years after a gun accident that almost took his life. Norris of Hillsville, Virginia, was shot in the face in 1997 and lost his nose, lips and most movement in his mouth. Since that time, he has had multiple life-saving and reconstructive surgeries but none could repair him to the extent where he felt he could return to society. He wore a prosthetic nose and a mask even when entering hospital for the transplant. REUTERS/University of Maryland Medical Center/Handout
Richard Norris is seen before (L) and after (R) his face transplant surgery in this combination of undated handout photos released by the University of Maryland Medical Center. Surgeons from the University of Maryland Medical Center on March 27, 2012, detailed what they said was the world's most comprehensive face transplant, allowing the 37-year-old Virginia man to emerge from behind a mask 15 years after a gun accident that almost took his life. Norris of Hillsville, Virginia, was shot in the face in 1997 and lost his nose, lips and most movement in his mouth. Since that time, he has had multiple life-saving and reconstructive surgeries but none could repair him to the extent where he felt he could return to society. He wore a prosthetic nose and a mask even when entering hospital for the transplant. REUTERS/University of Maryland Medical Center/Handout

Reuters

Mali junta leader Captain Amadou Sanogo speaks at the Kati Military camp, in a suburb of Bamako, March 22, 2012  Read more: http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,2110278,00.html#ixzz1qQIfkWiq
Mali junta leader Captain Amadou Sanogo speaks at the Kati Military camp, in a suburb of Bamako, March 22, 2012
Read more: http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,2110278,00.html#ixzz1qQIfkWiq

Under a sickle moon a large man with dreadlocks, a sparkling purple cloak and white moccasins climbed the stairs of the house that has become Mali’s new nerve-center. He was a marabout — a West Africa holy man — summoned by the 40-year-old army captain everyone in Kati is now calling le President. The new power in Mali is Amadou Sanogo, a career soldier whose improbable coup d’etat has upturned one of Africa’s strongest democracies. On Monday night he sought strength from the spirit world. He needs whatever help he can get.

It is a week since Sanogo led a mutiny at the garrison in Kati — a sleepy commune of cinder-block bungalows just north of the capital — that intensified into a coup. Swiftly condemned by the international community for daring to upset a rare — if perhaps superficial — African success story, Sanogo and his junta, the self-importantly named Comite national pour le redressement de la democratie et la restauration de l’ Etat (CNRDRE for short), must work out quickly how to cope with a sudden halt in economic and military assistance at a time when Tuareg rebels wage a devastating blitzkrieg in the north, protesters march and public figures bewail democracy’s death.

At the two-story house in Kati, formerly the camp commandant’s headquarters, Sanogo meets with a flurry of diplomats, soldiers and power-brokers, who wait on a first-floor verandah lined with ornamental plants. He smiles bashfully as he shakes the Algerian ambassador’s hand, as though he’s still growing into the role he’s plucked for himself. There’s a hint of the young Vladimir Putin, trying to project a persona that’s bigger than he is, and it’s easy to see why his American mentors (he attended multiple training programs in the U.S.) never marked him out as future leadership material as, apparently, is the case.

TIMETIME.com World

W. African bloc intends to restore Mali democracy

People march along a central street as thousands rallied in a show of support for the recent military coup, in Bamako, Mali Wednesday, March 28, 2012. The body representing nations in western Africa has suspended Mali and has put a peacekeeping force on standby in the most direct threat yet to the junta that seized control of this nation in a coup last week. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
People march along a central street as thousands rallied in a show of support for the recent military coup, in Bamako, Mali Wednesday, March 28, 2012. The body representing nations in western Africa has suspended Mali and has put a peacekeeping force on standby in the most direct threat yet to the junta that seized control of this nation in a coup last week. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

BAMAKO, Mali — A bloc of west African nations suspended Mali’s membership and is sending five presidents to Mali to try to “restore constitutional order” a week after soldiers ousted the democratically elected leader of this vast and impoverished country.

The Economic Community of West African States, or ECOWAS, is also putting a peacekeeping force on standby but the junta leaders are working hard to give the semblance of normalcy here. The airport serving the capital and the country’s land borders reopened on Tuesday and a nighttime curfew was lifted. Traffic was heavy, as offices reopened for the first time since the coup.

The junta showed images on TV of goods looted by soldiers being returned to their owners.

Alassane Ouattara, the president of Ivory Coast who holds the rotating chair of ECOWAS, told reporters after an emergency meeting in the capital of his nation — that itself was shot up and bloodied in a political crisis last year — that Mali’s democracy cannot be abandoned. The delegation of five African presidents was to head to Mali this week.

“We cannot allow this country endowed with such precious democratic instruments, dating back at least two decades, to leave history by regressing. It’s why Mali needs to immediately return its democratic institutions to normal,” said Ouattara. “This position is nonnegotiable.”

There is no immediate plan to deploy the peacekeepers, said Kadre Desire Ouedraogo, the president of the ECOWAS commission. The move suggests the bloc may consider force if the mutinous soldiers do not stand down.

Already, the United States, the European Union and France have cut off all but essential aid, a loss of tens of millions of dollars. Continue reading W. African bloc intends to restore Mali democracy

FG records N365.06bn deficit in 4Q

THE Central Bank of Nigeria, CBN, yesterday, increased the number of institutions excluded from sanctions associated with its cashless policy, with the exemption of all foreign agencies and missions in the country from adhering to the new rule on cash transaction.

CBN, in a circular to all stakeholders in the cashless policy project, entitled, ‘Industry policy on retail cash collection and lodgment (IITP/C/001) as it affects specialised international institutions,’ said this becomes necessary following the various treaties in which Nigeria is signatory to, which exempts  these institutions from all fees and charges in their host countries.

In a statement, Mr. Gaius Emokpae, Ag Director, Banking and Payments System Department, CBN, said, therefore, that it has exempted all embassies, diplomatic missions, multilateral and aid donor agencies in the country from penalties and charges on cash withdrawal and deposits with regard to the policy.

He said, “Nigeria is a signatory to several treaties which exempts these institutions from all fees and charges in the host country. As a matter of fact of international practice, sovereign states do not impose financial penalties on other sovereign states; it has become necessary, therefore, to extend the exemption on cash withdrawal/deposit to these institutions.”

FG overspent by N365.06 bn.

Continue reading FG records N365.06bn deficit in 4Q